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TOPIC: Why are my cattle coughing?

Why are my cattle coughing? 13 Jun 2011 19:32 #27602

  • CEW79
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I've got two heifers & one steer, all around 18mths old. They are in good condition and behaving as normal but I've noticed all 3 of them cough occasionally (they've never done it before). They've had regular drenching, they get a multi mineral salt block in their paddock and they've had copper & B12 when they were due to have it.

Do I need to be worried?
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Why are my cattle coughing? 13 Jun 2011 19:57 #379331

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Mine used to do this too occasionally. Not sure why, but would be interested in the answer too. Ours wasn't chronic enough or often enough to warrant further investigation, they weren't distressed, and were well fed and drenched.
5 acres, husband, daughter, son, me, about 12 sheep and their lambs, currently no ram (yay!), 2 Galloways, about 35 chooks, 3 cats and 2 budgies.
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Why are my cattle coughing? 13 Jun 2011 20:04 #379335

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No worry if it is ocassional, especially if they are eating hay.
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Why are my cattle coughing? 13 Jun 2011 20:06 #379337

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I notice ours cough after running to a new paddock. Figure cows aren't all that atheletic!
Unless stated, the above post is not meant as criticism.

Go back and read it again in your HAPPY voice!
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Why are my cattle coughing? 13 Jun 2011 20:56 #379344

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Denneaux;372366 wrote: I notice ours cough after running to a new paddock. Figure cows aren't all that atheletic!
Well who wants fit and trim cattle? Sort of defeats the purpose of having them I would have thought [;)]

Posted from here using my laptop :cool:

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Why are my cattle coughing? 13 Jun 2011 22:43 #379358

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CEW79;372358 wrote: I've got two heifers & one steer, all around 18mths old. They are in good condition and behaving as normal but I've noticed all 3 of them cough occasionally (they've never done it before). They've had regular drenching, they get a multi mineral salt block in their paddock and they've had copper & B12 when they were due to have it.

Do I need to be worried?

Probably not. You will, I would imagine, have started to feed out hay by now and the occasional coughing when on dry feed is normal. I see you live in Taupo and give copper and selenium. Do you address the cobalt deficiency as well?
Denneaux;372366 wrote: I notice ours cough after running to a new paddock. Figure cows aren't all that atheletic!

Nothing to do with being athletic. Cattle that cough after even a brief period of excercise are almost guaranteed to have lungworm. Not noticeable until they kick their heels up and then stand there coughing.

Cheers,
Ronnie
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Why are my cattle coughing? 14 Jun 2011 07:47 #379366

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Being a big mob of dairy heifers they are incapable of a "brief period of exercise", there is only one speed and that's fast, with detours from the direct route to lick and chase interesting objects! The one who circles and bellows the most wins!
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Go back and read it again in your HAPPY voice!
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Why are my cattle coughing? 14 Jun 2011 10:50 #379401

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Ronney, the cobalt is in the B12, and Co is needed to make B12 :-)
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Why are my cattle coughing? 14 Jun 2011 19:06 #379460

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yes rothwell but most people underestimate the B12 requirement...those short acting injections only last about 28 days. Providing adequate cobalt to an adult ruminant gives you a safety buffer - an adult ruminant should be making its own B12 if cobalt is available.

I love animals...they're delicious
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Why are my cattle coughing? 14 Jun 2011 20:28 #379476

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Yes I'm sure I covered cobalt too, had advice from the local vets (I think that's what the big capsules are I've got from the vet and stuck down their throats :D

No we don't feed out!! We live on the side of a steep hill and so no chance of making hay here. Also I only have 3 cattle and 2 ewes on 7 acres (mainly because I don't want to feed out over winter). There's always plenty for them to eat (standing hay my old farmer neighbour calls the paddock they are in now).

We've had plenty of autumn rain and still warm temps (no frosts so far) so the grass is still growing, which is amazing for this time of year.

Do you think they are just coughing coz they are cleaning up the longer dry bits of grass in the paddock they're in now. I'm wanting them to clean it all up before moving them. :confused: Or could they possibly have lung worm :confused::confused:
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Why are my cattle coughing? 15 Jun 2011 14:57 #379545

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Both are possible, but at 18 months the cattle should be making antibodies against internal parasites, unless they are sick or pregnant or hungry.
If you have been regularly dosing your animals, then you could very well have bugs that are resistant to the drench. If so, another drench won't help them. If you have lots of spare money you could find out from the vet how to get a test done to find out if they have lungworms. Hopefully there is a blood test, which tend to be more reliable than trying to get eggs to grow from a poo sample.
Thus, if they look sick, drench them and see if they improve. If they look happy and healthy, don't panic :-).
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Why are my cattle coughing? 15 Jun 2011 15:57 #379551

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What sort of coughing is it? Lung worm coughing is a pretty distinct, coughing up a lung sound. Whereas normal coughing sounds like them blowing their nose or a couch potato trying to run a marathon..if that helps
Unless stated, the above post is not meant as criticism.

Go back and read it again in your HAPPY voice!
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Why are my cattle coughing? 15 Jun 2011 16:04 #379553

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My new calf was coughing.....see my thread... :( and in this case it was the start of pneumonia. Mind you this was not just occasional!
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Why are my cattle coughing? 15 Jun 2011 22:17 #379605

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Rothwell;372591 wrote: Both are possible, but at 18 months the cattle should be making antibodies against internal parasites, unless they are sick or pregnant or hungry.
If you have been regularly dosing your animals, then you could very well have bugs that are resistant to the drench. If so, another drench won't help them. If you have lots of spare money you could find out from the vet how to get a test done to find out if they have lungworms. Hopefully there is a blood test, which tend to be more reliable than trying to get eggs to grow from a poo sample.
Thus, if they look sick, drench them and see if they improve. If they look happy and healthy, don't panic :-).

eggs do not come out in the poo with lungworm - the eggs are already hatched and come out in the dung as larvae so a specific faecal test is required for lungworm.
Gives new meaning to the term faecal float !

here is the lifecycle for lungworm

http://www.bovilis.com/diseases/lungworm/lifecycle.asp

I love animals...they're delicious
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Why are my cattle coughing? 16 Jun 2011 19:56 #379742

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Thanks cowvet :-) ..... but ..... does that make it easier or harder to find lungworms than to individually identify each type of worm egg? Do lungworms get excreted evenly? And how many per gram/10 grams/100g ie what sample size needs to be analysed?
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