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TOPIC: Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth

Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 27 Apr 2011 22:38 #27089

  • beaker
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Hi, all can anyone describe the difference between the two, my daughter needs to know for part of her studies and there seems to be some debate as to the answer so come on all you sheep people please advise
thanks
cheers
Beaker
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 27 Apr 2011 23:13 #374193

  • LongRidge
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That's an easy question to get right. A hogget is whatever you say it is, and a 2-tooth is a sheep that only has the first set of (2) adult teeth. A hogget can be a 2-tooth but a 2-tooth is not a hogget if your definition does not include it.
From "Black's Veterinary Dictionary", by Miller WC and West GP, 3rd ed 1953, Adam and Charles Black, London, p908
Birth to weaning: Male uncastrated - tup lamb, ram lamb, pur lamb, heeder
Birth to weaning: Male castrated - hogg lamb
Birth to weaning: Female - ewe lamb, gimmer lamb
Weaning to shearing: Male uncastrated - hogg, hogget, haggerel, hoggerel, tup teg, ram hogg, tup hogg
Weaning to shearing: Male castrated - wether hogg, wedder hogg, he teg
Weaning to shearing: Female - Hogg, gimmer hogg, hogget, ewe hogg, sheeder ewe, ewe teg
First to second shearing: Male uncastrated - shearing,shearling, shear hogg, diamond ram, diamont ram tup, one-shear tup
First to second shearing: Male castrated - shearing wether, shear hogg, wether hogg, wedder hogg, 2-tooth wether
First to second shearing: Female - shearing ewe, shearling gimmer, theave, double-toothed ewe, gimmer

I trust that this clears up the issue, and you now know exacly what is being talked about :-)
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 27 Apr 2011 23:31 #374195

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lol thanks Longridge clear as mud
cheers
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 27 Apr 2011 23:40 #374196

  • Kiwi303
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2-tooth, has more than 1 tooth, but less than 3 teeth :D

Basically put it's lost the first set of baby teeth and has it's first set of adult teeth, graduating from high value lamb to cheap mutton.

Hogget, anything over lamb but under old ewe. Unlike 2-tooth which has a fixed start point and a fairly closed end point when the next teeth come out. Hogget just means anything from off it's mum right up to nearly geriatric. It's like a Heifer, you can have a 10 year olf heifer if it's never had any calves, since a heifer is a maiden cow which has yet to have it's first calf.
Likewise Hogget starts when it's no longer a baby, and continues until the farmer thinks it's about dang time to start calling it a sheep.

hope this helps :D
You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 28 Apr 2011 11:43 #374207

  • Ronney
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Beaker, traditionally last years lambs will become hoggets as soon as the first lamb of this season in born i.e. a year old.

The situation becomes confusing because sheep will cut their first set of teeth anywhere between approx. 14 months and 20 months of age which puts them as 2ths i.e. rising 2 year olds.

It further becomes confusing because works will accept any animal as a lamb regardless of it's age if it hasn't cut it's first two adult teeth.

For the purpose of ageing I use the following criteria.

Lamb - well, is a lamb
Year old - Hogget
Two Teeth - Two years old, 2th
Four Teeth - Three years old, 4th
Six Teeth - Four years old, 6th

Anything past that is known as Full Mouth or Aged.

Does that help or confuse the issue even further? :p

Cheers,
Ronnie
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 28 Apr 2011 11:57 #374211

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I'm not a sheep person so I think in terms of Lamb, Hogget, Mutton so to me a hogget is more flavorsome then lamb and not as fatty and strong as mutton. Sorry not much help I know :p To me hogget is a generic term like youngman/woman (could be 13 or 30), whereas a 2 tooth is a specific stage in the sheep's life like teenager.
>

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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 28 Apr 2011 13:59 #374229

  • hilldweller
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Lamb or hogget depends on their future prospects :) The seven-month-old sheep I just sent to the works were lambs; the seven-month sheep I'm keeping to put to the ram in a year's time are hoggets (and will be 2tths when they lamb), but any that do poorly over winter will become lambs again and get sent off to the works before their adult teeth appear (at which point the works would consider them 2tths and regardless of what I choose to call them that's what they would pay me for).

Any seven-month sheep I was putting to the ram around now would definitely be hoggets because putting lambs to the ram just sounds wrong! And I'd still call them hoggets at lambing time regardless of what's in their mouth, and call the ones a year older 2tths though they'd be close to getting 2 more teeth by then.

But if you want to be 100% accurate, as Cinsara says, the transition from hogget to 2tth (adn then 4tth etc) is pretty clear - they either have the teeth or they don't.
hilldweller
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 28 Apr 2011 18:28 #374251

  • DiDi
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We used to lamb in July and they were called hogget once October rolled around the following year! The works used to treat them as lambs if put in before October but times may have changed because that makes them 15 months old.
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 28 Apr 2011 21:45 #374267

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My head is spinning ,thanks all for that. Daughter emailed her tutor to get an idea from her of what she thought a hogget was as the question for which we need to know what a hogget is, is dependent on what age a hogget is, which it appears can be any age by the sounds of it ,anyway havent heard back yet maybe the tutor is trying to determine the age of the hogget as well.
cheers
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 28 Apr 2011 23:06 #374281

  • Ronney
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Beaker, to reassure myself I went looking. The dictionary meaning of a "hog" (not pig) or "hogget" is a sheep that is one year old, two farming books I have say the same thing as does Wikipedia - and this is the way it has been for all my farming life which is now getting rather long.

Hogget is not a generic term, it is a specific stage in the age of a sheep where it is no longer a lamb but nor is it a mutton.

Cheers,
Ronnie
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 03 May 2011 18:56 #374646

  • akela
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Not sure where I got this but this is how I have understood it..
Lamb = up to 10months
Hogget = 10months - 15 months (or completion of 2nd tooth eruption) @ around 18months
Two Tooth = 18months - 24 months
Four Tooth = 24-30months
Six tooth = 30 months - 42 months
Full Mouth (eight tooth) = 42-48months onward
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Difference between a hogget and a 2 tooth 07 May 2011 21:25 #375018

  • beaker
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Hi all thanks for that I have copied and pasted to a word doc and sent to her thanks again
cheers
Beaker
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