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TOPIC: Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference?

Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 11:12 #26380

  • Andrea
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Thread title says it all, really... I've just been trawling TM recently for firewood listings, as we got some really good stuff last year... I saw a few people specifically ask if the pine was OLD MAN pine, or just pine... is it a different kind of pine, and does it burn differently?
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 11:18 #366830

  • LongRidge
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Old, or old man if you prefer, pine is quite different to plantation pine. They are both radiata, but as the tree ages the wood gets more dense. Plantation pine is rather like cheese, in colour and texture. Old pine is harder, denser and more red. Becuase of it's density, it will need to be stored for longer after cutting than plantation pine, to get the moisture out.
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 12:01 #366836

  • igor
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As LR says it relates to the age of the tree. Many people believe, and I agree with them, that the old growth wood is a better fuel because of it's higher density.
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 13:02 #366839

  • Kiwi303
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Those awesome scraggly tall pines standing in aloof majesty on their own or forming a shelter belt that looks like it was last trimmed by Methuselah are old man pines.

Much nicer on the fire, but since they tend to have a LOT more branches and from a lot lower down the trunck than plantation pine, it can be hell to split!

We have a stand of OMP down by the highway that was planted to shelter a schoolhouse back in the 1930's... one blew over or was pulled over in a snowstorm in winter of '08, good firewood.
You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 14:14 #366847

  • Organix
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As well as higher wood density the 'old man pine' timber will be far more resinous which of course adds to the energy contained in it for burning, and the expected life if milled for lumber.

Posted from here using my laptop :cool:

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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 15:55 #366859

  • kalnetta
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Burnwell fire wood has different sizes in old man pine I get large chunky and it stays burning for a lot longer.
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 17:47 #366869

  • Andrea1
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THanks for that! Very good to know, and thanks for the tip, kalnetta!
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 18:08 #366872

  • spoook
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Here is more useful info. Always something to learn.
There are no bad questions only those that are not asked.
"You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed"
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 18:15 #366874

  • Stikkibeek
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Old old pine can also be very high in gum, which while it burns pretty hot and smells nice burning too, it can be hell on your chimney.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 21:06 #366885

  • 4trees
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Hi Andrea, I am in the nursery industry and have been over the years they have been playing with the breeding of the pines. Many of the pines grown for timber,etc. have a GF 33, i.e. a number they have given the pines as they breed faster growing, trees for timber etc.
As others have said the wood is not as dense, and as these new types of pines grow extremely quickly they do not have the strength in the wood that the old ones had, which grew a lot slower therefore the wood is denser. One reason why when we have the big gales sometimes a number of pine plantations suffer damage, the wood is soft and grown so quick it snaps easily, and often the root system appears not to be as good as the slower growing older variety. Hope this throws some light on it for you.
Cheers
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 21:43 #366890

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Yes, thanks to all for the information. Maybe that's why the old 85-100 yr old pines here are still standing, while the younger ones planted 30 years ago down the road have fallen over in the winds and earthquakes!

Live and learn -- one of the things I love about this forum is all the help with the learning. :D :D
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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 17 Feb 2011 22:09 #366896

  • Organix
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4trees;358189 wrote: ..... and often the root system appears not to be as good as the slower growing older variety. Hope this throws some light on it for you.
Another reason for the lack of roots is where pines are planted on ex-grazing land that still has substantial fertiliser content so the trees grow quickly without having to 'hunt' for nutrients. A good blow on such young trees results in swept butts or complete blowover as they have more 'sail area' than the roots can handle.

Posted from here using my laptop :cool:

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Pine v. Old Man Pine - is there a difference? 20 Feb 2011 10:26 #367127

  • ddonalds
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We use bits of old man pine to make firelighters. Just split a bit of the very resinous parts into fine kindling. When you want to start a fire, just hold a match under a bit of this and drop it into the standard kindling. It has been a few years since we brought little lucifers or mucked around with news paper.
DD
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