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TOPIC: Wormery

Wormery 11 Feb 2009 08:25 #16843

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I've received an email...
I was hoping you may be able to point me in the direction of where I could buy a wormery. I've searched the net but to no avail. Any advice would be great as I'm new to NZ and haven't quite fathomed which stores sell what.

I would suggest somewhere like Mitre10 as a first port of call...does anyone have a better idea?

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Wormery 11 Feb 2009 08:41 #251360

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The Warehouse also had them. Even TM has them now and again.

Geez, good old Google......... look here [:I]
There are no bad questions only those that are not asked.
"You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed"
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Wormery 11 Feb 2009 09:17 #251366

Ain't Google great! And I can recommend the Can'o'worms... very easy to use and drain.
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Wormery 11 Feb 2009 10:29 #251392

The ones at the Warehouse do not have the tap in the bottom so are harder to drain, but they are much, much cheaper- about 39.99 (and they work fine, we have one). The rounder ones with the tap in the bottom layer for easy drainage can be bought at Bunnings for around 100 dollars. At Mitre 10, the exact same one is 47 dollars more again.
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Wormery 11 Feb 2009 10:49 #251399

A friend of mine cunningly uses old baths which she has up on frames, and she gathers the juice from the plughole. I don't know for sure but I imagine she sweeps new stuff to one end to move the worms, gathers old castings from the other end for fertiliser... I just bought an old bath off trademe for my raspberries, for $10. Would be cheaper, and larger. The worm farm I bought years ago from Mitre 10 worked: but I ended up firing the lot in the compost bin where they seemed to live happily ever after, simply because keeping the acidity in the worm farm correct was proving too much for me.
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Wormery 11 Feb 2009 20:58 #251541

We bought a "Can-O'Worms" -round with tap and 4 layers from Bunnings for $129.95 A good deal normally around $150 or for $160 you can get that same one with worms from the recycling shop/dump in Ashburton-They give you heaps of advice and plenty of things to read....They have several different types set up as well..Perhaps they have something similar where you live??
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Wormery 12 Feb 2009 07:27 #251580

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Some garden centres have them, too - I saw them at the Airport garden centre (Hamilton).
Ne vous fachez pas [;)]
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Wormery 12 Feb 2009 09:49 #251615

What area? the airport garden centre in Hamilton had worm farms for sale and the worms to go in them. I just used an old bath.
kats
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Wormery 12 Feb 2009 13:17 #251679

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The term worm farm would probably work better in the NZ search :) Maybe wormery wasn't turning anything up cause its not commonly used here
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Wormery 14 Feb 2009 15:03 #252124

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[:0]Wow those things sound a bit pricey to me.
I made mine out of an old 44 gallon plastic drum that had a hole in it, so would have got it for nothing.
Laid it on it's side with the hole up & one of the bungs down, then cut a foot wide strip out; mounted the drum high enough to get a 30L container under the outlet --put a small mesh bag full of chip gravel in the outlet, made a lid for it & it was all go.

I have had over 60L of worm tea this season[^]

The worm farm must be shaded & kept cool or you will end up with cooked worms

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Wormery 02 Jan 2010 07:51 #311579

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I have a worm farm that is really doing well, but I want to add my doggie doos to it. Having 2 Bullmastiffs is a lot of doo, so I am worried about overloading the farm.
I estimate a 10L bucket of doo every month to 3 weeks[:I]
Which seems like a lot for the Can-O-Worms farm that I have. I will try smaller amounts first, say 20% of the volume that I put in there every month will be doo.
Should I put it in fresh, or leave it for a few days, then put it in?
I just don't want to damage an already good thing, but it is such a large reasource going to, erm... waste.
What's that I just stepped in?
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Wormery 02 Jan 2010 09:30 #311585

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If they have an Environment Centre nearby, they will probably find they are selling them also.

The Can o Worms ones are good as you can use them inside/in garage/under carport/in shed and (relatively) easily moveable...
Take a break...while I take care of your home, your block, your pets, your stock! [;)] PM me...
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Wormery 02 Jan 2010 10:33 #311596

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Westie love your road marker sign:D:D will never look at one the same :Dagain
Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:
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Wormery 02 Jan 2010 10:52 #311602

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Westie;296243 wrote: I have a worm farm that is really doing well, but I want to add my doggie doos to it. Having 2 Bullmastiffs is a lot of doo, so I am worried about overloading the farm.
I estimate a 10L bucket of doo every month to 3 weeks[:I]
........
I would be hesitant to put that much dog doo in a worm farm. Firstly the use of carnivores faeces is a potential health concern, apart from the smell aspect. Secondly, if you are regularly worming your dogs do not put the poo in the worm farm for some days after treatment as the worm killer will have a similar effect on your earthworms.

If the amount of dog poo is a problem perhaps drop it down the septic tank vent :cool:

Posted from here using my laptop :cool:

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Wormery 02 Jan 2010 13:45 #311625

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Good point about the worming. Have researched about that and no doo's for 2-3 days after worming.
The info I can find does not say how much, or what % can be doo
I will try a little bit to start with. Have to be careful, as I don't want to upset what is a very good worm farm, but being just me and my kitchen green waste is not really enough to keep the cute little wormies going. Sometime I nick some 'off' vegies from the rubbish bins at the fruit shop to tide them over
The quantity of doo is not really a problem, I just want to try and make use of at least some of it. They eat a fair bit, it would be nice to get something usable back.
sod
Westie love your road marker sign:D:D will never look at one the same :Dagain
It was a car club I used to belong to in West Auckland, now disbanded. That was our T-shirt logo.
What's that I just stepped in?
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Wormery 02 Jan 2010 22:02 #311658

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I do the dog-do-shuffle every few days & understand how you feel; but I would not put dog droppings into any compost that I was planning to eat food from.
I mix our dog's endless supply with wood ash & place it in the collection drum.
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Wormery 11 Jan 2010 10:14 #312898

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Westie;296243 wrote: I have a worm farm that is really doing well, but I want to add my doggie doos to it.
We've processed our dog poop through a worm farm for years and it works well, but the secret is not to give them anything else to eat. Just the dog poop.

Also, don't put the poop in for about 3 days after worming the dpogs or you will kill the worms in the farm as well.
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Wormery 22 Jan 2010 23:52 #314712

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While I was doing a bit of net study about doos and worm farms, an Aussie council website about worm farming also suggested you can put dog hair in your farm:confused:

It was the only place I came accross that suggested that one. After careful consideration I made the choice not to try doos on my lovely wormies, not wanting to mess with a good thing. But dog hair, that couldn't hurt to try. Even if they don't eat it, it will just be fibres in the castings.
So two weeks ago a good handfull was placed in a corner.. went to check on it today and there was only a bit left.
I couldn't see any worms in the area that it was but at least 70% has dissapeared. Will keep a further eye on it and see if it gets completely absorbed before adding any more.
Not that I really need to add any but I do like to give the worms as much variety as I can and was interested to see if they would actually eat it. The jury is hung over that for now, have to wait a bit longer to know for sure.
What's that I just stepped in?
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Wormery 23 Jan 2010 10:49 #314738

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I had a friend years back who farmed worms commercially. A couple of the potential wormery additions he used were human hair clippings (beware dyes and shampoos) and coffee grounds.
One problem he did have however was with citrus skins which attracted colonies of a type of mite that appeared to generate a repellant substance for the worms [xx(]

Posted from here using my laptop :cool:

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Wormery 23 Jan 2010 11:10 #314743

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Human hair would be risky, shampoos and dyes as you say Organix, but my dogs are au natural:cool:

Interesting what you can actually put in there. And what you can't.
What's that I just stepped in?
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Wormery 31 Jan 2010 00:52 #315777

Apparently you can empty the contents of your vacuum cleaner into the worm farm as well!! Along with shredded paper, cardboard, veges etc. No citrus, onion or garlic I think.
For dog poop I am planning to put in a small septic tank for our dog! Cut the bottom out of a bucket with a lid and bury it in the garden with just the lid showing. Put in poop and add some "septic Starter", same that you use in your own septic tank to start the process off. Then just keep adding your poop! I love this idea, but it is strongly recommended that you only use it in an ornamental garden, not an edible one!! I geuss the praciticality of that would depend on how many dogs you have as well - our small med sized dog should not be a problem.
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Wormery 13 Feb 2010 23:18 #317816

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Blimeyvicki wrote
For dog poop I am planning to put in a small septic tank for our dog! Cut the bottom out of a bucket with a lid and bury it in the garden with just the lid showing. Put in poop and add some "septic Starter", same that you use in your own septic tank to start the process off. Then just keep adding your poop!
I've seen something similar to this on an English gardening programme. If I remember rightly, they had a deeper hole than the bucket, but it was cut in such a way that the bucket fitted snugly in the top. Lid kept the flies and rainwater out and a variety of worms did the breaking down. If this system eventually got filled up, there is potential to dig another hole, back fill the existing one and plant an ornamental on top. Dogs can be changed to a vegetarian based diet, which might make the disposal of their waste easier to deal with.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 15 Feb 2010 10:25 #317968

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I have a bagless vacuum and I dump the 'collection' in my worm farm after wetting it in a bucket first (unless your farm is already too wet, then turn it through to dry the mix out a bit). This has dust and wool and cat hair and it goves the worm castings a good texture (keeps it lighter and more friable). Of course you wouldn't want to di this is you had a synthetic carpet or used any sort of deodorisers or whatnot...
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Wormery 31 May 2010 21:58 #331255

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Hasbeen;230399 wrote: [:0]Wow those things sound a bit pricey to me.
I made mine out of an old 44 gallon plastic drum that had a hole in it, so would have got it for nothing.
Laid it on it's side with the hole up & one of the bungs down, then cut a foot wide strip out; mounted the drum high enough to get a 30L container under the outlet --put a small mesh bag full of chip gravel in the outlet, made a lid for it & it was all go.

I have had over 60L of worm tea this season[^]

The worm farm must be shaded & kept cool or you will end up with cooked worms
Hasbeen, I'm interested in further comment about your worm farm. I have just constructed a worm farm from a plastic drum and last week OH made a cradle for it to sit on. I presume you made the mesh bag to stop the worms from escaping, but I have some questions that need answering.

1. What do you do for ventilation.
2. did you make a lid out of the off-cut from the side, which is what i have done.
3. Do you have trouble with flooding in the bottom of the barrel, given there's 15cm of undrainable space
4. Have you harvested any worm casts from the barrel.

I have two can-o-worms going at present, but find that they get too heavy to lift the trays out of, and the legs collapsed as did the taps, so they are not so very well constructed where it counts. Their best advantage is I can regather worms that I tip out with the castings, by putting a bin on the pile of castings, with food in it. They quickly crawl back inside.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 31 May 2010 22:16 #331257

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Gidday

I saw a worm farm that was in one of the free local papers down here. I think it was on our local Councils pages.

It had a small bit of corogated iron resting on a sloping block foundation so that the slop ran down the corogations and a bit of old spouting to collect the worm pee. On the iron they simply had 4 old car tyres of even size and the rims of the tyres stuffed with newspaper.
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Wormery 31 May 2010 23:07 #331263

Stikkibeek;318100 wrote: Hasbeen, I'm interested in further comment about your worm farm. I have just constructed a worm farm from a plastic drum and last week OH made a cradle for it to sit on. I presume you made the mesh bag to stop the worms from escaping, but I have some questions that need answering.

1. What do you do for ventilation.
2. did you make a lid out of the off-cut from the side, which is what i have done.
3. Do you have trouble with flooding in the bottom of the barrel, given there's 15cm of undrainable space
4. Have you harvested any worm casts from the barrel.
We have made a worm farm out of a bath. My hubby built a cradle for it so it sits about bench height. This also means that I could attach plumbing to the plug hole with a tap in it to drain the worm wee. I just emptied 12 litres out of it today!! For the flooding in the bottom of the bath I put in a big layer of gravel with a piece of weed mat over the top. This means the fluid can build up to about 10cm without drowning my wormies. I have an old sheet of corrugated iron over the top held down with a bungy to stop it flying away in the wind.

It has been in for about 2 months so far and is now starting to really ramp up production of worm wee and eating of scraps. I am very happy so far!! Good luck with your worm farming :) :) .
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Wormery 01 Jun 2010 07:30 #331268

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For ventilation and drainage I have some drainage pipe lying on the bottomthat has a pantyhose legg over it to stop the worms getting out the holes, that fits in the bottom and gives air for the lower area and acts as the drain so onto the drum hole which is now on the side..
to add and remove the castings I have 3 bits of carpet [carpet squares] and add one end and shove the older stuff to the other, then when I want to remove it, I leave the area open to sunlight for 15mins the worms disappear to the other end then easily remove the earth and very few worms.. then fill that end up and take from the other next time.. cost about $5 if one counted what I got for free also
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Wormery 01 Jun 2010 10:20 #331281

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blimeyvicki;300896 wrote: ...
For dog poop I am planning to put in a small septic tank for our dog! Cut the bottom out of a bucket with a lid and bury it in the garden with just the lid showing. Put in poop and add some "septic Starter", same that you use in your own septic tank to start the process off. Then just keep adding your poop! I love this idea, but it is strongly recommended that you only use it in an ornamental garden, not an edible one!! I geuss the praciticality of that would depend on how many dogs you have as well - our small med sized dog should not be a problem.
We tried one of these, but it was unsuccessful. Our two dogs didn't do a huge volume of poo for their size, because they were on good food with no filler, but two large dogs was probably more than twice what the "dog loo" could cope with. The proceeds from one medium size dog should work better. :D
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Wormery 04 Jun 2010 23:07 #331870

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Stikkibeek;318100 wrote: Hasbeen, I'm interested in further comment about your worm farm. I have just constructed a worm farm from a plastic drum and last week OH made a cradle for it to sit on. I presume you made the mesh bag to stop the worms from escaping, but I have some questions that need answering.

1. What do you do for ventilation.
2. did you make a lid out of the off-cut from the side, which is what i have done.
3. Do you have trouble with flooding in the bottom of the barrel, given there's 15cm of undrainable space
4. Have you harvested any worm casts from the barrel.

I have two can-o-worms going at present, but find that they get too heavy to lift the trays out of, and the legs collapsed as did the taps, so they are not so very well constructed where it counts. Their best advantage is I can regather worms that I tip out with the castings, by putting a bin on the pile of castings, with food in it. They quickly crawl back inside.
Sorry I missed this Stikkibeek.
1. my lid is a hunk of ply in a manure sack & the ends are higher than the sides so there is a wee gap.
2. No that was long gone protecting a young plant against a fence.
3. No I have it slightly tilted forward.
4. I harvester by filling the high end first then as they moved forward I dug out.

When the barrel was 3/4 full I had over 120ltrs of tea so I liberated the worms & went back to growing rhubarb in the barrel.
I only use 1 tablespoon of worm tea to 5 ltrs of water so I think that lot will see me out. :D
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Wormery 05 Jun 2010 09:48 #331890

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When the barrel was 3/4 full I had over 120ltrs of tea so I liberated the worms & went back to growing rhubarb in the barrel.
I only use 1 tablespoon of worm tea to 5 ltrs of water so I think that lot will see me out. :D
Interesting that you don't keep the bin in constant production. I intend to do this so I can re-arrange the less user friendly can-o-worms. I'll post some pics of the finished product once I have it fully set up.

I painted the cradle with waste diesel oil the other day. It is treated timber, but with cut ends, the timber merchants say it's best to seal with something. I want it to last since OH made it look very professional.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 05 Jun 2010 18:40 #331940

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My worms are back in my 2 compost bins doing their thing.
I was always frightened that if anything happened to me the poor worms would be locked in & starve to death before anyone thought about them.

In the compost bins if they are not fed they can just migrate to greener pastures. :)
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Wormery 13 Jun 2010 13:04 #332983

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Here's the finished product. It has just started to produce wee, since I tipped a portion of the old system in. Worms are happy to stay put in the food and other compost matter. Note the lid. has two small hinges on right of lid, and two small stoppers on left, plus knob. Fixing it this way, prevents it falling in


By angling the cradle, it prevents a build up of water/wee in the bottom of the barrel, and it's high enough to keep a 10 litre bucket under the bung hole.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 13 Jun 2010 13:12 #332985

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Looks good Stikkibeek, I covered mine with bubble wrap to keep the temp even.
I had to erect shade cloth as well as they can get very hot in summer or freeze in winter.

How do you keep rain out of the bucket?
As you can see in the picture I used a 30ltr container placed under an overhang.
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Wormery 13 Jun 2010 13:18 #332986

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Hasbeen;320029 wrote: Looks good Stikkibeek, I covered mine with bubble wrap to keep the temp even.
I had to erect shade cloth as well as they can get very hot in summer or freeze in winter.
It will be within the shade of a big plum tree in the summer, so should be all right heat wise. I had no problems with baked worms in the black can-o-worms which sat in the same place.
How do you keep rain out of the bucket?
As you can see in the picture I used a 30ltr container placed under an overhang.
Rain shouldn't be a problem. It will go in the bucket a lot at this time of the year of course, but summer time rain will just help to dilute the wee, and I can tip it back through the bin from time to time, to keep things nice and moist. I'll modify things if I need to.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 13 Jun 2010 18:17 #333020

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Stikkibeek, they say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Consider yourself flattered. :D One question tho' do the worms freeze in winter in that bin? I have thought of putting my worm farm on the south side of the barn which means it would get all the southerly and easterly bad weather in winter, will the worms be able to cope with this?
Carbon-based biological unit.
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Wormery 14 Jun 2010 00:13 #333054

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Well now Valmai, I haven't put this one to the test through a winter yet, but can say I have not lost worms to frost in any winter here yet, and the black plastic can-o-worms is about the same thickness as the barrel. Mind you, our winters at worst would not get below -6ºc on a very "bad" frost. If you are in a heavy frost or snow zone where you are, you could cover them over winter, or move them into the barn. They don't have a preference for location, but do work more energetically if on the warmer side of cold, rather than the colder side of cold, if that makes sense, and of course they do not smell, so even in a shed, or basement or veranda etc, could be alternatives for the winter.

Decomposing food scrap will also give off a small amount of warmth.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 13 Jul 2010 12:52 #336795

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As a variation on the old bath idea, some people we know keep their tiger worms in an old spa pool. They reckon the bigger volume is better.
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Wormery 13 Jul 2010 16:26 #336832

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Stikkibeek;320106 wrote: ......

Decomposing food scrap will also give off a small amount of warmth.
True, but it would not be adviseable to aim for compost heap heating conditions as worms do not move into a compost heap until after the heating (thermoplilic) phase.

Posted from here using my laptop :cool:

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Wormery 14 Jul 2010 08:50 #336911

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Stikkibeek;320027 wrote: Here's the finished product. It has just started to produce wee, since I tipped a portion of the old system in.

Wee??
That's black garden gold Stikkibeek[^]

Good setup. Everyone should have one :)
What's that I just stepped in?
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Wormery 14 Jul 2010 09:50 #336914

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I've been feeding the worm wee to the silverbeet. It has changed from a bright shiny green to a dark glossy green :)
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 08 Aug 2010 09:03 #340379

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Here's an update. Wormery is working really well. I find that I can tip a bucket of water in and drain. It is maintaining a good output of diluted worm wee which is rich in minute particles of worm poo. The plants I have been tipping it on look awesome.

I'm getting a lot of vinegar flies in there too though. Anyone know if they are harmful or good in the overall scheme of things. I am having to be super careful when I open the lid that they don't go down my air way. Note to self. keep mouth closed when opening lid[xx(]

There are lots of juvenile worms in there too, so winter hasn't slowed down procreation.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 23 Oct 2010 12:46 #352572

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I was reading thru this because I'm thinking of getting something like a can'o'worms, but on the 'bigger is better' comment, I wonder if I could use my black plastic compost tumbler bin as a wormery instead? What would I have to do to make it work? I think it may have a drain hole (not that I can remember seeing one) but I could put one in. Should I put a layer of gravel with some flyscreen mesh over it in the bottom? Or should I start small with a can'o'worms and work my way up once I get the hang of it? Remember, lazy is my middle name. :-)
Tomorrow is the day I will stop procrastinating.
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Wormery 30 Oct 2010 20:26 #353375

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If you have hover flies in your area mesh is a must.
Worms are their food of choice.
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Wormery 30 Oct 2010 20:28 #353376

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Stikkibeek;324473 wrote: I've been feeding the worm wee to the silverbeet. It has changed from a bright shiny green to a dark glossy green :)
How strong were you using it Stikkibeek?
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Wormery 07 Nov 2010 22:57 #354231

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Sorry HB, I missed your post earlier. The worm wee will be diluted but don't ask me by what. Basically I tip a bucket full of water into it each day, and drain back into the bucket. Then when drained, I tip all that on selected plants. The wee is very dark now and you cannot see through the density of the colour.
The worms are thriving. I have found the bin is working much better than I hoped it would. You should see the size of the strawberries I have been feeding wee to. It is a much better bin for harvesting from, than the can-o-worms which I started out with. That used to silt up, and I used to get worm die off with it. Also the legs are the weak part of can-o-worm bins as they are not built strongly enough to carry the weight of the trays when they get full of scraps. I find that the worm silt washes out of my blue drum along with the watered wee, so the weight is more or less static. I'm not only gaining the plant tonic, but a good soil conditioner with the worm castings too. [^]
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 02 Mar 2011 22:29 #368211

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I'm currently using the warehouse worm farm, it works well, but I think I may have issues soon with needing a lot more room for my wormies as I now have a lot more plants to feed. Some great setups in this thread, very ingenious. :)

To dig in one’s own earth, with one’s own spade, does life hold anything better? –Beverly Nichols


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Wormery 27 Oct 2011 21:23 #398085

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16 months on and I am delighted with my wormery. Scraps levels continue to stay static and I have increased the output of diluted wee now that the summer garden is in. I turned over the content last weekend to make sure that some oxygen was getting to the lower layers and I was astounded by the volume of worms. The old "can-o-worms was never this good. Infact I used to have die-offs in it. This drum is loaded with all ages of worms. If I get a fine day I will photograph the inside of the drum for you all. Now, what can I do with my other two drums :D
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 18 Nov 2011 08:18 #401281

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I have 2 visiting horses and want to start both worm farm and compost bin .. oh .. and a raised garden

Can I put horse poos in a wormery?
canajanz
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Wormery 18 Nov 2011 17:50 #401349

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canajanz;396598 wrote: I have 2 visiting horses and want to start both worm farm and compost bin .. oh .. and a raised garden

Can I put horse poos in a wormery?
If you have a biggish worm farm, yes, Some-one near here doing a big worm farm and using a variety of manures, but if you are only using a small bin for instance, you will need to limit the quantity you put in, or mix well with other compostable things
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 16 Sep 2012 22:49 #438333

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Humbug. During the northerly gales yesterday, the wind got under the lid of my bin and flipped it open. When I went to close it this morning, two brazen blackbirds flew out, cackling with alarm at my intrusion.........on their feast of my hard working tiger worms. I'm feeling very cross with them as the worm population was so dense that they were consuming about 5 litres of compostable material in just 24 hours. I have put the lid back down and will check under the internal cover in the morning to see if I still have a good group of worms.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 17 Sep 2012 10:21 #438364

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Stikkibeek;437602 wrote: Humbug. During the northerly gales yesterday, the wind got under the lid of my bin and flipped it open. When I went to close it this morning, two brazen blackbirds flew out, cackling with alarm at my intrusion.........on their feast of my hard working tiger worms. I'm feeling very cross with them as the worm population was so dense that they were consuming about 5 litres of compostable material in just 24 hours. I have put the lid back down and will check under the internal cover in the morning to see if I still have a good group of worms.

To prevent such a thing from happening, hubby has fabricated a double latch made of two pieces of alcathene, screwed together straddling the frame. latches from both sides, so door can't cave in or blow open.
[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth
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Wormery 03 Jul 2013 19:40 #464371

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chrisgray;466319 wrote: Hi, interested in purchasing a worm farm. There are a lot of options, any recommendations?
Thanks
Chris
New member Chrisgray has caused me to revisit this older thread.
I must say that my wormery is still performing extremely well. All last summer during the drought, I kept up the 10 litre bucket of water poured into the bin each day, and the run out of worm silt and wee, I fed onto the infant orchard trees. While this required a bit of effort carting water, the results have been very good and the trees continued to grow though summer with additional watering. Every second week, the buckets of wee and silt, were tipped onto a piece of nearby garden and it was interesting to see the lomandra and other plants responding. Soon, my new greenhouses will be in and I will be using the wee in them. May have to consider moving the bin closer, although it is in an ideal place in the chook pen at present. Yes the chooks partake of the wee too when the drainage bucket gets full. I have a good double wheeled wood barrow that will be suitable for carrying the buckets when full, so I won't have to lug them far.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 29 Jul 2013 18:22 #466104

I'm in the process of making a worm farm and came across this thread - great info :) Mum has a can o worms type one, and pours water through fairly regularly, and the castings have gone all compacted and soggy. I'm not sure if this is due to too much water, or not enough of the right type of food (they get mainly raw fruit and vege scraps). It doesn't look aerated enough for the worms to me. Just wondered, Stikkibeek, whether yours goes like this with pouring the water through every day?
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Wormery 29 Jul 2013 19:08 #466114

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Mousewhisker;468277 wrote: I'm in the process of making a worm farm and came across this thread - great info :) Mum has a can o worms type one, and pours water through fairly regularly, and the castings have gone all compacted and soggy. I'm not sure if this is due to too much water, or not enough of the right type of food (they get mainly raw fruit and vege scraps). It doesn't look aerated enough for the worms to me. Just wondered, Stikkibeek, whether yours goes like this with pouring the water through every day?
Yes to the can o worms. I think it has some serious design faults, including weak legs which collapse under the weight, taps that break off and the silt does go gluggy and difficult to handle, whether you water, or don't water. I think the holes in the trays are simply too small. I couldn't lift a full tray, it became so heavy. I used to get a lot of worm die off too and the resulting gluggy mess would stink.
I do not get this at all in my blue-made myself-bin. It has a piece of stainless steel mesh on the bottom, which looks similar in size to a normal large sized strainer. I find I lose very few worms and the wee and silt wash out well. The resulting level in the barrel remains fairly static, only going up a bit when I tip a new lot of scraps in. No mass die off either. The colony is thriving and a mix of all ages.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 29 Jul 2013 21:23 #466136

Ah, that's interesting, so is probably caused by not enough drainage. That makes sense. So, with your mesh, when you say it's similar to a large size strainer - do you mean a kitchen type sieve? I'll try to get something similar for mine :)
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Wormery 30 Jul 2013 00:46 #466150

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Mousewhisker;468312 wrote: Ah, that's interesting, so is probably caused by not enough drainage. That makes sense. So, with your mesh, when you say it's similar to a large size strainer - do you mean a kitchen type sieve? I'll try to get something similar for mine :)
Yes. The wire in it is quite firm (Unlike the kitchen strainer) but the mesh is about as open as that. I'm not sure where OH got it from, but it could be the sort of thing that covers air ducts. I guess anything that is firm enough to stop the food scraps getting to the bottom would be good, such as an old radiator core, or fire grate for instance, although that may be a bit heavy if you want to shift the bin, doesn't matter if the worms go through it, they will climb back up the side of the barrel anyway, it just needs to have a bit of strength, so there is a gap under it to allow drainage. We found a piece of stainless steel mesh ideal here. It is strong, lightweight and doesn't rot. The piece we put in the bottom is about 30cm wide and is as long as the barrel.
Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
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Wormery 30 Jul 2013 19:28 #466230

Thanks Stikkibeek, that gives me a good idea of what to look for. I'll have a rootle round and see what I can find :D
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